Stressful Age: Good News/Bad News For Boomers

Tiepolo at Stresshacker.com First the good news. A study based on the 2008 Gallup poll of 340,000 Americans has identified 50 as the age when people begin to feel better about themselves. Prior to that age, people generally feel progressively worse from age 18. The study was published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Following the sharp reversal at about age 50, most people report better self-satisfaction at increasing levels up to age 85.

Now for the bad news. According to the latest figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the suicide rate among people age 45-54 years has increased at a surprising pace since 2006. Typically, individuals aged ≥80 years have had the highest rates of suicide in the United States. Since 2006, however, rates of suicide among persons aged 45 to 54 years in the United States have been the highest. The majority of suicides in this age group were among white, non-Hispanic males.

The CDC speculates that problems related to mental health (depression), job loss, financial reversal (foreclosure, loss of investment value), or relationships (divorce, bereavement) might be contributing to the rising rates of suicide in this age group. Abuse of alcohol and/or drugs was a frequent precipitant or “facilitating” factor for the suicide.

Brothers, fathers, friends in this age group who may be feeling overwhelmed and have had a recent significant stressor may be at risk. Suicide crisis hotlines (in the United States: 1-800-784-2433 or 1-800-273-8255) are available as a first line of defense. Among the best protective factors is the availability of support from immediate family and close friends.

The Changing Face of Stress: Who Me? Worry?

14938596 Worried_Bernanke

There is a new way of managing stress and it’s called “don’t worry, be happy!” Yes, I know the Bobby McFerrin song that hit #1 on the charts before the French Revolution, that is, way back in 1988. This is 2010, however, and it’s way more than just a popular song.

It is the new creed of the Why Worry Generation, as it has been aptly named, which is also known as Generation Y or simply Generation Me. It is composed of the young people who grew up in the boom-and-bust years, that have known Columbine, September 11, and the biggest recession since the Great Depression. They have seen their parents lose their jobs, their bank go bust, their family savings evaporate; many have had their homes foreclosed. They have also experienced the skyrocketing cost of school, saw gas seesaw up to almost $5 per gallon and back. They have seen Katrina, the big spill in the Gulf. They have lived through Desert Storm, Iraq, Afghanistan. Many have died or been wounded there or know someone who did.

And yet, they are optimistic. They are positive about the future. Despite the fact that there are no jobs available. That the graduating classes of ‘08, ‘09, and ‘10 have had an increasingly hard and frustrating time in finding any decent job, let alone a good paying one or one with career advancement opportunities. That their parents and anyone older than 40 is walking around with good reasons to be gloomy and depressed.

These young adults seem to exude positive self-regard, ooze self-esteem, and a resilience that older generations may dismiss as foolish and reckless. Their self-confidence seems unfazed by having to live at home instead of getting their own place, or even having to move back into their parents’ home after a brief stint on their own.

There is another explanation for this resilience in the face of a steady barrage of bad news. It may be the result of adjusting to high stress levels and, over time, building up tolerance for change and uncertainty. This is what is predicted for individuals who are able to accept and rationalize adversity and turn it into a learning experience, instead of being destroyed by it. It is the ability to use the stress reaction to produce an adequate response to challenging circumstances.

So unlike the Greatest Generation, the Millennials, and of course the Baby Boomers, this generation is making good use of stress, making the changes that are called for, and refusing to worry or to feel sorry for themselves. Way to go, guys!

Learning From Stress: The Locus of Control

Dali_1954_PiramidesWhen it comes to handling stressors and managing the stress reaction, are you an internal or an external?

Our response to a stressor can be classified in many ways, but when it comes to our interpretation of its impact on our capabilities and resources we fall along a continuum from internal (“I feel I can handle this”) to external (“I can’t handle this by myself”) locus of control.

On one side of the continuum are individuals who feel capable of taking personal responsibility and are therefore inclined to believe that success or failure in handling the stressor can be found primarily within their own resources, i.e. their locus of control is internal. At the other end of the continuum are individuals who do not feel capable of assuming responsibility over the stressful situation and are therefore more inclined to believe that success or failure in handling the stressor hinges on luck, chance, or help from others; their locus of control is external. What are the implications of locus of control? Read more after the jump.

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Business of Stress: Self-efficacy Predicts Success

StradaCampoImperatore In the demands-control model of occupational stress a situation is created whereby high demands are placed on the individual with little opportunity to exercise control over the work environment or the task design. This is the most common type of workplace stressor and it has been shown to have an impact on cardiovascular health. But is the problem simply a matter of demands/control stress diathesis? Why isn’t everyone succumbing to heart disease? Indeed, many individuals seem to thrive even in work environments where personal control is minimal and job demands are chronically high. How?

At least a partial explanation can be found in self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is the perception that personal resources are adequate to meet life’s demands. Even in situations of low control/high demands, adequate self-efficacy can act as an important protective factor.

When personal resources are perceived as lower than perceived job demands, low self-efficacy results. Task demands are felt to exceed coping abilities, which often creates emotional and physiological overload. Prolonged exposure to occupational stress with low self-efficacy increases vulnerability to burnout, which is characterized by physical and emotional exhaustion, interpersonal difficulties, apathy toward personal accomplishment, and occupational disengagement through cynicism about the importance or worth of one’s work contribution.

Individuals with adequate self-efficacy believe that their available personal resources are sufficient and may even exceed what is required by their workloads. In day-to-day work activities, this belief in one’s adequate resources accompanies the process of assessing tasks and personal capabilities: in most instances, the perceived balance is in favor of having more than what it takes and the task is undertaken with vigor and confidence. Read more

Coaching Insights: Stretched or Stressed

Vermeer_1662_Art_of_painting Whether work demands stress or simply stretch is a subjective assessment and is often a matter of degree or accumulation. Subjectively, what may be stressful for one individual may be stimulating or productive in another.

I’ve been an air traffic controller at Kennedy International Airport for 20 years. Most people would call this job high-stress, but I thrive on it. You either love this type of job or you quit, or you never get into it in the first place. You’d think I was the type of kid who loved excitement or always took chances. I wasn’t. I could never be a firefighter and go into a burning house. That would be stressful. It’s just not in my makeup. (…) While we’re working, we’re “in the zone.” We work for two hours and then take a break. It’s mandatory. I don’t care how good someone is, after directing busy traffic for awhile, you need to decompress. At the end of those two hours, you know you’ve done a good job if the planes assigned to you were within the limits. I like that instant feedback.
Stephen Abraham

Degrees of stress or its accumulation also matter in determining stress vs. stretch. One may be able to manage stressful situations quite well at work (where specific motivation, competencies, skills and experience may come into play) but not in other aspects of life such as relationships, parenting, nutrition, fitness (where different skills may be required).

One way to determine whether work demands constitute simple stretch or even stimulating arousal that leads to more productive results, or instead cross over into the harmful stress category is by assessing balance. See a simple how-to after the jump. Read more

Stress Software: You Survived Monday Morning?

vanGogh_1889_StarryNight_MOMANY Is There a Better Time of Day to Have a Heart Attack? This question was asked by Dr. David J. Lefer of the Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta in a study published this February. (1)

According to Dr. Lefer, it is widely accepted that the time of the day, the day of the week, and the season of the year influence the risk of a cardiovascular episode.

For example, heart attacks occur more frequently early on Monday mornings, especially during the fall and winter months. Recent research confirms that there is also “a significant contribution of intrinsic mechanisms mediating temporal dependence of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology,” medspeak for “the time of day and day of the week matters a lot, no matter where you are.”

Dr. Lefer cites the example of travelers who appear to retain time-of-day oscillations if they have a sudden cardiac episode, in such a way that the peak incidence is equivalent to the early hours of the morning in their time zone of origin.

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