Why Hardiness Is Faster Than Competitiveness

aaBruegel_HuntersSnowDo you know someone who deals with stress by working harder and faster to produce more in a shorter time? These so-called type A personalities appear to have a stronger than average sense of urgency, can be more highly competitive, and may be frequently and more easily angered when things don’t go their way. Stress reduction and stress management is perhaps one of their most urgent needs, yet these individuals are perhaps the least likely to take the time to learn effective self-management techniques.

Unfortunately, as discussed in our recent post on the impact of stress on the heart, type A personalities suffer from a significantly higher rate of cardiovascular disease than type B personalities. The former may be more successful at getting things done faster. Type B’s may be slower and somewhat less effective, but they can play and relax without guilt, are much less hostile and unlikely to exhibit excessive competitiveness.

Hardiness Matters More Than Speed

The evidence for the difference in health outcomes between type A and type B originally came from groundbreaking research by S. C. Kobasa of the University of Chicago. Dr. Kobasa looked at personality as a conditioner of the effects of stressful life events on illness by studying two groups of middle- and upper-level 40- to 49-year-old executives. One group of 86 individuals suffered high stress without falling ill, whereas the other group of 75 individuals became sick after experiencing stressful life events.

The results of the study showed that, unlike the high stress/high illness executives, the type B group was characterized by more hardiness, a stronger commitment to self-care, an attitude of vigorousness toward the environment, a sense of meaningfulness, and an internal locus of control. These “slower-paced” individuals appear to view stressors as challenges and chances for new opportunities and personal growth rather than as threats. They report feeling in control of their life circumstances and perceive that they have the resources to make choices and influence events around them. They also have a sense of commitment to their homes, families, and work that makes it easier for them to be involved with other people and in other activities.

SH_Rcmds_smAccording to Herbert Benson and Eileen Steward, authors of Wellness Book: The Comprehensive Guide to Maintaining Health and Treating Stress-Related Illness, the incidence of illness is much lower in individuals who have these stress-hardy characteristics and who also have a good social support system, exercise regularly, and maintain a healthy diet.

[amtap book:isbn=0671797506]

This is a stress management book well worth reading, because it specifically targets hardiness and better stress management with type A personalities in mind. It is the Stresshacker Recommended selection for this month.

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