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When Stress Hurts: Curing Psychogenic Pain

villa-Era-Vigliano-Biella_Current treatments that effectively reduce or eliminate psychogenic pain is the subject of this, the sixth and last post in the series on the close association between psychological stress and psychogenic pain. Encouraging news for psychogenic pain sufferers from the pharmacist: A growing number of patients reports that by taking antidepressants they have experienced a significant reduction in the frequency and intensity of pain. More specifically, relief of psychogenic pain with antidepressants has now been thoroughly documented in the treatment of pain associated with bulimia (Faris et al., 1998), vulvodynia (Stolar & Stewart, 2002), chronic pain of undefined origin (Davis, 1990; Pilowsky & Barrow, 1990), migraine headaches (Kaniecki et al., 2006), chronic pain associated with depression (Bradley, Barkin, Jerome, DeYoung, & Dodge, 2003), functional bowel disorder (Drossman, Toner, & Whitehead, 2003), neuropathic pain (Fishbain, 2000; Saarto & Wiffen, 2005), and post-herpetic neuralgia (Max, 1994).

Non-pharmaceutical Treatments

As we have seen in a previous post, there is a strong emotional and affective component to pain of any origin, whereby pain always has a depressive effect on our mood. There is also ample evidence that pain is often the unwelcome companion of depression, anxiety, psychological trauma, anger and irritability. Even the mere expectation of pain, in the absence of any noxious stimuli, appears sufficient to produce it  and its perception, as has been documented in functional MRI (fMRI) changes to specific brain structures (Fields, 2000; Keltner et al., 2006). Conversely, diverting cognitive attention or causing distraction can mitigate pain, as shown in PET scans of cortical activation (Petrovic, Petersson, Ghatan, Stone-Elander, & Ingvar, 2000).

SH_Rcmds_sm UnlearnPain_BookHoward Schubiner, MD and Michael Betzold are the authors of Unlearn Your Pain, an excellent book that seeks to help reverse chronic pain by promoting a thorough understanding of its principal cause, learned nerve pathways (see Stresshacker’s explanation of the concept in this post). It offers a revolutionary step-by-step process that has been reported to work well by many psychogenic pain sufferers. It is Stresshacker’s recommended book resource.

Psychological Treatments That Can Eliminate Psychogenic Pain

The effectiveness of purely psychological interventions in the relief of chronic or acute pain is supported by the fact that pain and stress share many of the same biochemical processes, neural pathways and CNS structures (see this post for a full explanation).

Decreasing psychological stress through better stress management or counseling has been documented as effective in treating low back pain that is co-occurring with depression (Middleton & Pollard, 2005). There is also evidence that psychosocial interventions are efficacious for pain secondary to arthritis or cancer (Keefe, Abernethy, & Campbell, 2005). Multidisciplinary approaches, including relaxation therapy, biofeedback, behavior modification, hypnosis, desensitization and cognition therapy, have also been proven successful in treating chronic pain of unknown origin (Singh, 2005). Biofeedback therapy can be particularly successful in reducing colorectal pain (Jorge, Habr-Gama, & Wexner, 2003). Hypnotherapy, cognitive therapy, and brief psychodynamic psychotherapy appear to work well in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (Blanchard & Scharff, 2002). Hypnosis has been proven effective in relieving oral pain (Golan, 1997), cognitive behavioral therapy for functional bowel disorder (Drossman et al., 2003), behavioral therapy for the treatment of headaches (Lake, 2001); and family therapy interventions have been associated with successful psychogenic pain treatment (Liebman, Honig, & Berger, 1976; Roy, 1987).

Previously in this series: