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The Changing Face of Stress: Who Me? Worry?

14938596 Worried_Bernanke

There is a new way of managing stress and it’s called “don’t worry, be happy!” Yes, I know the Bobby McFerrin song that hit #1 on the charts before the French Revolution, that is, way back in 1988. This is 2010, however, and it’s way more than just a popular song.

It is the new creed of the Why Worry Generation, as it has been aptly named, which is also known as Generation Y or simply Generation Me. It is composed of the young people who grew up in the boom-and-bust years, that have known Columbine, September 11, and the biggest recession since the Great Depression. They have seen their parents lose their jobs, their bank go bust, their family savings evaporate; many have had their homes foreclosed. They have also experienced the skyrocketing cost of school, saw gas seesaw up to almost $5 per gallon and back. They have seen Katrina, the big spill in the Gulf. They have lived through Desert Storm, Iraq, Afghanistan. Many have died or been wounded there or know someone who did.

And yet, they are optimistic. They are positive about the future. Despite the fact that there are no jobs available. That the graduating classes of ‘08, ‘09, and ‘10 have had an increasingly hard and frustrating time in finding any decent job, let alone a good paying one or one with career advancement opportunities. That their parents and anyone older than 40 is walking around with good reasons to be gloomy and depressed.

These young adults seem to exude positive self-regard, ooze self-esteem, and a resilience that older generations may dismiss as foolish and reckless. Their self-confidence seems unfazed by having to live at home instead of getting their own place, or even having to move back into their parents’ home after a brief stint on their own.

There is another explanation for this resilience in the face of a steady barrage of bad news. It may be the result of adjusting to high stress levels and, over time, building up tolerance for change and uncertainty. This is what is predicted for individuals who are able to accept and rationalize adversity and turn it into a learning experience, instead of being destroyed by it. It is the ability to use the stress reaction to produce an adequate response to challenging circumstances.

So unlike the Greatest Generation, the Millennials, and of course the Baby Boomers, this generation is making good use of stress, making the changes that are called for, and refusing to worry or to feel sorry for themselves. Way to go, guys!