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Sugary Drinks Linked to Higher Blood Pressure

aaMatisse_1948_PlumBlossomsSoft drinks, sweetened fruit juices, and sugar-loaded sports drinks raise blood pressure, according to a International Study of Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP). The researchers measured the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, sugars, and diet beverages (which contain high quantities of glucose and fructose) over the course of four days, administered two 24-hour urine collections and eight blood-pressure recordings, and asked questions about the patients’ lifestyle and medical history. Results show that there is a direct correlation between fructose and glucose intake and increases in blood pressure and that sugar-sweetened beverages are associated with a 1.1-mm-Hg increase in systolic and 0.4-mm-Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure after adjustment for weight and height.

Sugar-sweetened beverages have been linked to high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart-disease risk, and this is one more piece of evidence showing that if individuals want to drink these drinks, they should do so in moderation. Also, one of our interesting findings was that the association between sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and blood pressure was stronger in people who are consuming more sodium. We already know that salt is bad for blood pressure, but what we’re finding is that if you’re consuming more sodium, you appear to be, at least in this study, exacerbating the effects of these sugar-sweetened beverages.—Lead investigator Dr. Ian Brown (Imperial College London, UK)