Stress and Breast Cancer

Chenonceau Castle at Stresshacker.com Learning how to better cope with stress had a significant positive impact on the lifespan and quality of life of a group of women with recurrent breast cancer. Researchers at Ohio State University’s department of psychology reported the results in the latest issue of Clinical Cancer Research Journal, published by the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Patients [who learned how to reduce stress] evidenced significant emotional improvement and more favorable immune responses in the year following recurrence diagnosis. In contrast, stress remained unabated and immunity significantly declined in the assessment-only group," said Dr. Barbara L. Andersen, principal researcher at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.

Analysis of the data of the 11-year-long study showed that of 227 women in the study group, the women who had received stress management training had a 59 per cent lower risk of dying of breast cancer.

This excellent news, reported by Medical News Today, is further confirmation that treating the symptoms of the stress reaction through cognitive (psychoeducational) and behavioral interventions can have a powerful effect on health. It is especially beneficial to learn how to directly manage the stressor that is causing the reaction, how to reduce its impact by a combination of stress-reducing techniques of relaxation, appropriate nutrition, adequate sleep, and the affirmation of positive statements about one’s ability to cope and overcome the challenge.