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More Stress, Skipped Lunches & Temp Jobs

In the 2011 survey, What’s Keeping HR Leaders Up at Night?, Human Resource Executive® reports that 74% of Human Resources executives say their level of job stress has increased in the past 18 months. Almost one third (32%) blame that on the difficulty they encounter in retaining key talent. “And it absolutely should keep them up at night,” says Wayne Cascio, senior editor of the Journal of World Business and a professor at The Business School at the University of Colorado in Denver. “I would be worried, too, and I’d be especially concerned about replacing high performers.”

This latest survey on the insights and perspectives of 782 senior-level HR executives at organizations nationwide finds that the top two challenges identified in last year’s survey – ensuring employees remain engaged and productive (41%), and retaining key talent as the economy recovers – also remain top of mind for this year’s respondents.

No Lunch For Most Workers

Two thirds of employees either eat lunch at their desk or take no lunch at all, according to a survey by Right Management, a division of global temporary staffing and consulting giant Manpower Inc.  One third of employees, or 34%, said they take a break for lunch, but eat it at their desks. Fifteen percent said they take a break from time to time, while another 16% said they seldom do. Only 35% said they regularly take a break for lunch.

Temporary Jobs Often the Only Game in Town

Staffing employment increased 5.4% from the first to the second quarter of this year, according to data released by the American Staffing Association (ASA). This is the sixth straight quarter of temporary and contract employment growth since the industry began its recovery from the 2007–2009 recession.

The U.S. staffing industry had a healthy second quarter as businesses continued to turn to flexible workforce solutions to meet increases in demand for their products and services—Richard Wahlquist, ASA President and CEO.

“For job seekers the news is also encouraging, as staffing and recruiting firms added more than 200,000 new jobs in the past 12 months.” U.S. staffing firms employed an average of 2.8 million temporary and contract workers from May through June — 8.6% more workers than in the second quarter of 2010.