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Marriage Reduces Level of Stress Hormones

Venice at Stresshacker.com It is a well-established fact that being married can improve health outcomes. Now, new research findings get more specific and suggest that a long–term bond between two people can also reduce the production of hormones associated with stress. This is according to Dr. Dario Maestripieri, Professor in Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago and lead researcher, who published the results of the study in the August 2010 issue of the peer-reviewed journal Stress.

To measure the effects of a committed relationship on stress levels, Dr. Maestripieri and his team monitored changes in salivary concentrations of testosterone and cortisol in response to a mild psychosocial stressor (a set of computerized decision-making tests) on a sample of over 500 participants. The aim of the study was to investigate any gender differences in hormonal responses to psychosocial stress; the relationship between pre-test hormone levels and stress-induced hormonal changes; and any possible sources of same-gender variation in pre-test hormone levels as compared to hormonal responses in a larger human subject population. 

The results show that males had higher concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol than females both before and after the test. After the stress-test was administered, cortisol level increased in both sexes but the increase was larger in females than in males. Single males without a stable romantic partner had higher testosterone level than males with stable partners, and both males and females without a partner showed a greater cortisol response to the test than married individuals with or without children.

It would appear from the test results of this study that married individuals, when faced with a new stressor, respond with a lower production of stress hormones. This can have two major benefits: it can permit a more deliberate response to the stressor (as the system is not overloaded with a debilitating and hormone-filled stress reaction), and it can, over time, reduce the accumulation of allostatic load on the organism—two good things that help married people confront challenges in more supportive, less stressful, and more effective ways.