, ,

Beyond Reaction: An Intelligent Response to Stressors

aaAltdorfer_SusannaElternA stress reaction that gets “stuck” into alarm mode and never progresses toward a resolution of the stressor can develop into chronic stress or depression. The latter can be conceptualized as turning inward, shutting off the world and avoiding all but the most necessary contact with the stressor. It is a rather primitive and ultimately ineffective way of coping with stressful events and situations (for better ways of defending against stress see this post), but it is undeniable that it works at reducing the level of incoming inputs and the effort required to respond. When stress causes anxiety, what follows is a semi-permanent state of arousal (which can have dangerous health consequences). When the response is depression, what follows is a significant reduction in functioning—to the extent that the person is not anxious but apathetic, withdrawn, and unresponsive even to positive stimulation.

The Coping with Stressors Inventory

Adapted from the Coping Styles Questionnaire (CSQ) by Roger, Jarvis, & Najarian, (1993), this is a simple way to determine our instinctive and preferred ways of managing stressors as they appear in our lives. These are ways that are characteristic of our behavior and are most likely to be used under conditions of severe stress.

Instructions: Mark as many as apply, but make sure to choose only the ones that you are most likely to use or have definitely used in coping with severe stressors.

When I am confronted with a severe or continuing stressor:

1. I ignore my own needs and just work harder and faster.
2. I seek out friends for conversation and support.
3. I eat more than usual.
4. I engage in some type of physical exercise.
5. I get irritable and take it out on those around me.
6. I take a little time to relax, breathe, and unwind.
7. I smoke a cigarette or drink a caffeinated beverage.
8. I confront my source of stress and work to change it.
9. I withdraw emotionally and just go through the motions of my day.
10. I change my outlook on the problem and put it in a better perspective.
11. I sleep more than I really need to.
12. I take some time off and get away from my working life.
13. I go out shopping and buy something to make myself feel good.
14. I joke with my friends and use humor to take the edge off.
15. I drink more alcohol than usual.
16. I get involved in a hobby or interest that helps me unwind and enjoy myself.
17. I take medicine to help me relax or sleep better.
18. I maintain a healthy diet.
19. I just ignore the problem and hope it will go away.
20. I pray, meditate, or enhance my spiritual life.
21. I worry about the problem and am afraid to do something about it.
22. I try to focus on the things I can control and accept the things I can’t.

Results Evaluation: Even-numbered ways of coping are more constructive, while the odd-numbered ones are less constructive tactics for coping with severe or continuing stressors. Checking more even-numbered items indicates a better approach to stressors that takes into account the need for self-care, emphasizes the seeking of support, and confronts the stressor in effective ways. If more odd-numbered items are checked, this may indicate an attempt to cope with stressors by avoidance, smothering the stress reaction with chemical means, and generally retreating into tactics that may temporarily reduce the symptoms of stress but fail to address the causes.