Anger and Sadness Increase Fibromyalgic Pain

Turner_1835_DidoBuildingCarthage Perhaps another study that falls into the “I knew it all along” category: Anger and sadness increase pain in women who suffer from fibromyalgia.

A recent study conducted at the University of Utrecht on 121 women, 62 of which were suffering from fibromyalgia, confirmed a significant increase in pain levels in response to both anger and sadness. A greater angry or sad reaction was associated with a correspondingly greater amount of pain response.

Results of the study showed that in half of the female patients, the experience of anger or sadness in response to a significant daily emotional event predicted more pain at the end of that day. The anger–pain link was more pronounced among patients with a longer duration of fibromyalgia and among those with higher average anger levels. 

Among the study participants, pain levels were highest on Fridays and lowest on Sundays, which might reflect a gradually increasing pain during the work week. However, patients who worked did not show a more pronounced weekly pain increase than unemployed patients. Relaxing activities and quality time during the weekends of both working and non-working women appeared to reduce the pain.