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6 Worst and 6 Better Ways to Manage Time

How much can time management cost in terms of stress and health risk? It depends on how we choose to manage it. Some choices appear more effective but have short-term benefits and high cost. Others appear lower in stress and health cost but do not seem to use time efficiently. What’s the right answer?

Let’s look at some of the most popular time management approaches, their costs and benefits in terms of allostatic load and stress-related health risk, and an estimate of their long-term effectiveness in getting things done.

  1. Manage time resources allowing for ample relaxation time and with the goal of avoiding all stress.
    couchpotatoAllostatic Load: Probably low to very low.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably low. There may be other health risks connected with low physical activity levels.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Probably not great at getting things done in a timely manner.
    Not all stress is bad and to be avoided. We experience the stress reaction not only in terms of frustration and anxiety, but also as excitement, thrill, energy and useful motivation. The attempt to eliminate all stress from our life would run counter to our biopsychosocial nature, which requires stimulation, interaction and activity.
    The Better Way: Achieve balance between work and relaxation, family and job demands, personal time and social time, activity and rest.
  2. Manage time resources on a moment-to-moment basis with little or no planning ahead because planning itself just takes more time. frantic-harrison-ford1
    Allostatic Load:
    Probably high.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably high, as stress symptoms may be ignored.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Probably very good at getting some things done in the short term, giving the illusion of long-term efficiency.
    Frantically going from crisis to crisis, handling each new task as it comes up, without assigning priorities or allocating resources is a reactive approach to time management. It can appear chaotic to the observer. Each new challenge is met head-on and is always “new” because there is little or no provision made in advance.
    The Better Way: Plan ahead for demands and challenges that can be predicted, anticipated and prepared for. Planning indicates self-care, not weakness.
  3. Manage time resources and get more done in less time by using caffeine, sugar, alcohol, nicotine, “energy” drinks or other chemical enhancers. crash
    Allostatic Load:
    Probably high, but masked by chemical “fixes.” Chronic stress.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably high, as useful stress signals for rest may be ignored, sleep suppressed, nutrition casual and expedient.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Probably very good at getting many things done in the short term.
    When using chemical means to increase energy and output over what the body can safely handle before needing to rest and replenish depleted resources, quality of output is likely to suffer and efficiency to diminish. The illusion of strength that can be derived from these forms of self-medicating fatigue may be merely postponing a crash,  intoxication, tolerance and, in some cases, addiction.
    The Better Way: Listen to the body’s signals. View natural sleep as vitally important, wisely use times of pause and relaxation to recharge depleted resources. Avoid becoming dependent on chemical substances to function.
  4. Take stress and inefficiencies to mean that there isn’t enough time to get done what needs to get done, and that just having more time would “easily” fix it.
    lastminuteAllostatic Load: Probably high.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably high, as stress symptoms may be ignored.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Probably okay to get some things done in the short term, but poor long-term efficiency.
    Actually, a time management problem is not using time to the fullest advantage, and to get done what needs to be done with just the right amount of energy expenditure, no more no less. Simply adding more time slots to the schedule, cramming a full to-do list, and shortchanging quality is a short-term strategy.
    The Better Way: Find an optimal schedule that fits available energy and mental resources levels, and stick to it. Say “no” to some demands as a key to preserving balance between rest and activity.
  5. View being always very busy, and generally busier than others, as a badge of honor and a sure pathway to success.
    workaholic Allostatic Load: Probably very high, chronic stress.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably high, as the need for balance may be dismissed.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Can lead to some success in the short term, but may take the highest toll on physical, mental and social health.
    Although this approach is by far the preferred one by type A individuals who take pride in being productive and getting a lot of things done, it has significant drawbacks. There is an an adjective that describes its devotees: workaholic. Being always extremely busy can result in poor allocation of resources, i.e. doing mostly what is considered urgent and too seldom what is truly important.
    The Better Way: Work is a means and not an end unto itself. Success is also measured by other yardsticks besides those of wealth and power. Balance is valued as a smart, resource-efficient strategy for long-term success in all facets of life.
  6. Pursuing time management strategies that ignore the truth: I feel pretty good, I am getting things done, so I must not be too stressed.
    IBS Allostatic Load: Probably very high.
    Stress-related Health Risk: Probably high, symptoms of stress go unnoticed.
    Long-term Effectiveness: Can lead to some success in the short term, but may take a high toll on physical, mental and social health.
    In reality, many adults don’t even know when they are at dangerously high stress levels until their bodies tell them so in a dramatic way, e.g. when sudden chest pains lead them to the nearest emergency room. It is easy to miss the early warning signs of chronic stress, as long as coping still works, more or less. Many psychosomatic illnesses are directly related to stress and overwork but are attributed to other causes or even ignored altogether.
    The Better Way: Listen to the body’s signals. View pain as a precious ally that alerts us to something in our system that requires immediate attention, and self-care as more than just a quick fix that kills the signal without addressing the cause.